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20110331
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>>> tonight on "world news," question sell it? president obama tells americans why he is risking u.s. fighters and all those billions of dollars in libya. >>> women versus walmart. the nation's biggest employer heads to a showdown in the nation's top court and the subject is sex discrimination. >>> curing diabetes? could surgery -- look at this woman before and now this woman after. could surgery work for 14 million obese americans with type ii of the disease. >>> and seven years old and sexy? a big company selling push-up bikinis for little girls as a lot of americans are wising up today to say it's time to draw the line. >>> good evening and thank you for joining us this monday. in less than one hour the president will take to the airwaves to try to convince americans that it was the right decision for the u.s. to be part of the allied fight in libya. a third battle front for the united states. with a lot of military force on the line and costing possibly billions. our jake tapper is standing by in the hall where the president is about to arrive at the national defense university i
tapper, who starts us off at the white house, where the study was released just today. >> reporter: good evening, diane. the white house released today what it called the most comprehensive study by the government on women in almost 50 years. each day, 72 million women in the u.s. get up and either head to work or look for work. they're a group of women who are better educated than ever before. but they still make less than their male counterparts, on average, only 80% of what a man makes. this woman graduated with a masters from columbia and went to work for a magazine in new york city. her male counterpart with the same job and only a bachelor's degree was paid $3,000 a year more. >> i felt de-valued. i felt like i didn't count. i felt inferior to my colleague. >> reporter: sometimes it's discrimination, but there are other factors, as well, behind back inequity. >> one reason is they're not going into the kinds of fields that are high income producing. so the president has had an effort to encourage women and girls to go into science and technology and engineering math. >> reporter: w
up in the u.s. milk supply. exactly how much? is it completely safe? we take you inside the laboratory to see for yourself. >>> tornado fury. violent twisters tossing everything in their path, even striking the space center in florida. >>> mega-wow. seven overjoyed coworkers claim that $319 million prize. and we find one of the colleagues who opted out of the ticket that day. what did he say to us? >>> and, coming home. the marine who watched the birth of his first child from the battlefield with us finally gets to hold her tiny hand, right here, tonight. >>> good evening. we begin with america's milk, and that radiation from japan. all day, we have heard the reassurances that the radiation now being found in some of the u.s. milk supply is minimal and poses no risk. so, we spent this day answering some serious questions. since the radiation in some form has been found in 20 states, exactly how much has been linked to the milk and how the are experts sure that it is safe? abc's abbie boudru is at a lab in california tonight. abbie? >> reporter: diane, with radiation stil
perfume. but her humanitarian work may be her greatest legacy. using her fame, she raised millions for aids research, standing by rock hudson, one of its first victims, when others shunned him. to the public, she may have been the last great movie star. but for those who knew her, she was also a loving mother and loyal friend. >> there have been so many lessons, life and death lessons, emotional lessons. i don't believe in regrets. and i have no idea what's going to happen tomorrow, no one does. >> and barbara walters is here now. we were saying earlier, we don't think of her as a pioneer, but her sheer fearlessness about her own choices in life changed things in this country. >> reporter: absolutely. by the way, she never wrote her all biography. this, all the different clips that people will see, that's her all biography. she was gutsy and salty and funny. look at what we talked about. married eight times, she wanted to get married, she married them. she wanted to divorce them, she divorced them. she jumped into aids when nobody did. she stood by people who were rejected. michael
the president to flood the market with some of the u.s. strategic petroleum reserve, with 727 million barrels of oil, it's the largest on the planet. >> i do believe that the announcement of a strategic petroleum reserve sale would help to moderate escalating prices. >> reporter: but experts differ on how much of a real impact that oil would have on gas prices. >> a lot of what's happening is fear. what could go wrong? but maybe it reduces a little bit of that fear. >> reporter: the president's response? not yet. and diane, unless things in the middle east worsen, analysts tell us that these gas price hikes will probably take a bite out of the economic recovery but probably won't cripple it. diane? >> okay, matt. something else is heading higher today, as well, welcome news. jobs. a strong 192,000 new jobs added last month. unemployment dropping to 8.9 percent. david muir is checking in. >> reporter: for millions of americans this has been a very long road back to finding a job. and all of us have been watching that one number, the average time to find a job. 37 weeks now. but tonight, these
prices in the same towns, so why is this happening and how do you find the best deal, steve joins us from atlanta. steve, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, diane. we did a little comparison shopping today and at current prices, two gallons of gas is roughly the same cost as this t-bone, the gas it takes to get you to the steak house is now more than the beef. outside chicago, autumn says it's unreal. in the past two weeks she's watched gas jump up 45 cents a gallon and she nearly fell over when it cost her $64 to fill up. today we went with her as she and her children made all of their trips in one drive spending as little time on the road as possible. >> i was really shocked when it didn't stop till 68.04. >> reporter: outside atlanta when they do go shopping mark and lisa mcintire told us they buy much more in bulk and drive to the store slowly to help save on gas. >> you got to drive a little slower sometimes too. >> reporter: really? >> of course. you save. >> reporter: you do this? >> yeah, i do. >> reporter: the average cost is 3.52. just 2.35 of that buys the oil and 35 cent
of the skies. so what's next for u.s. forces and what will gadhafi do now? >>> radiation in food from japan. >> fukushima fresh vegetables. >> we do our own tests. >>> and an american family after ten days of hope learns their daughter was lost trying to save others. >>> men, women and jobs. which sex is getting 90% of the new jobs and why? >>> and sibling secrets. are you an older or younger sibling? news by which order gives you an edge in health and happiness. >>> good evening, as we come on the air tonight beginning this week together the united states is still in the middle of an international assault on moammar gadhafi's libya. but the battle is moving at breakneck speed. it is called "operation odyssey dawn" and as of tonight the skies are clear. gadhafi's forces have come to a halt though there are still big questions. how soon can the u.s. hand over the lead to other countries? who are these libyan rebels and are we even on the same side? and what is next? will gadhafi fold or could this go on for years? we have team coverage from washington to libya beginning with martha raddatz o
with secretary of state hillary clinton about the u.s. intervention in libya, how we got involved and how it will end. but we bring you a headline tonight. are there signs that colonel moammar gadhafi and those close to him may be trying to find an exit, even though gadhafi appeared on television, promising to win? also, as abc news has reported on "good morning america," libyan dip low malts say at least one of gadhafi's sons may now have been killed by a libyan pilot on a kamikaze mission so, here is what secretary clinton told us today about gadhafi and the report about his sons. there's a report that two of gadhafi's sons, at least one, but maybe two, have been killed. can you confirm this? >> well, i can't confirm it, but we've heard it. and we've heard a lot. >> reporter: credibly? >> well, we hear it from many different sources. and that's why i can't confirm it. i can't give confirmation because, you know, the evidence is not sufficient. but we've heard that. we heard about other people close to him reaching out to people that they know around the world, africa, the middle east, e
gays have a right to do it. >>> terror attack a gunman shouting in arabic opens fire on u.s. troops at an airport in germany. >>> and, made in america. the family who said we could take away everything in their house made overseas, stunned by the truth. tonight, we show them how it looks when we buy only from workers here at home. >>> good evening. they are our parents, our neighbors and we learned today that by the millions they are vulnerable to a kind of invisible elder abuse. it was all brought home by the original all-american kid in the old time movies, mickey rooney who is now 90 years old. he silenced the room on capitol hill of his story of financial abuse, bullying and shake. adding, if it can happen to him, it can happen to anyone. and abc's claire shipman watched it all today. >> reporter: diane, it is estimated that as many as 3.5 million americans are victims of elder abuse. it does have a broad definition. it can be physical abuse, neglect, sheer theft, which is what mickey rooney talked about in his wrenching testimony, where he said all of them can cause devastating
, schools and money. well, today, bill gates, whose foundation spends hundreds of millions of dollars on u.s. schools, called out state officials for incompetence, wasting money and making grave mistakes about teaching american kids to succeed. and roin clal born is here with what was really a wakeup call. >> reporter: that's right. it's not often that bill gates inserts himself into one of the hot button issues of american politics. but he is doing that now, voicing radical ideas on how to make schools work and sharp criticism for who is to blame. at today's conference, gates was on the attack over how states are dealing with the crisis in american education. >> the guys at enron never would have done this. i mean, this is so blatant. so extreme. is anyone paying attention? >> reporter: for the past year, gates has been focused on how to make schools and teachers better. and how to pay for it. >> state budgets are a critical topic, because here's where we make the real trade-offs. if we make the wrong choices, education won't be funded the right way. >> reporter: gates has been looking into
. the embattled leader threatens another vietnam in the u.s. intervenes, as he rides his golf cart through tripoli. >>> the presidential race begins today. campaign 2012 kicks off, as the first republican challengers to president obama announce they're ready to run. >>> fighting for his kids. charlie sheen launches a custody showdown. his soon-to-be ex-wife says he threatened her life. calls him insane. but admits her own struggle with addiction. so, where do the twin boys really belong? >>> and hang on. a woman hangs on to the hood of a car. how did she hold on tight for 35 miles and survive? >>> hello, everyone. we have a lot to get to this morning. starting out with more information about that terrorist attack against americans in germany. two service members killed. two others wounded at the frankfurt airport. german authorities now indicating that the gunman who fired on the american troops at close range was driven by islamic extremism. apparently he was yelling allah akbar. was he a lone wolf? or did he have help? >> we're going to answer the questions right away. >>> and a look at serena w
with another plane. a u.s. airways plane, pierced by a bullet? the inside stories of two very near misses. >>> and what is seaworld thinking? a year after killing his trainer, the largest orca in captivity will perform again this morning. >>> prince harry plunges into polar waters with our bob woodruff. speaking out about his brother's wedding plans. and preparing for his role as best man. >>> baby doll brawl. the doll that has parents in an uproar because it's teaching girls to breast-feed. is this too much too soon? >>> good morning, everyone. and, boy, facebook is lighting up with that controversy. >> uh-huh. you said you wouldn't mind. >> i don't think i would. we're going to get into that. >>> the latest it of japan. it's been three weeks since that earthquake. and the nuclear reactor is still not under control. they're trying everything to get it under control. the u.s. has sent over robots now. officials trying to contain all that radiation, also with a method that's never been used before. but we do have rare good news this morning from one of the top american experts sent over to
with some of the most expensive gas in all of the land. he's in orlando for us this morning. good morning, matt. >> reporter: good morning, robin. the price for a gallon of regular here, $5.39. and this is going to get worse as the summer approaches. analysts we spoke to said we could see prices this high across the country. now, even the airlines are starting to take it out on us. southwest airlines, raising its prices by $10. the latest casualty, as gas prices soar, the airline industry. united/continental airline, the largest airline in the world, is announcing scrapping its plans to grow the company in 2011, because of fuel price. that, after raising ticket prices last week by $20. the national average for gas has zoomed past $3.50 a gallon. >> it's frustrating. >> reporter: the nation's cheapest gas, mth, $3.19. california has the most expensive fuel, $3.90. but the priciest gas, here in orlando, florida. some of the most expensive gas station in the united states. pulling up. see how much it costs to fill. less than three-quarters of a tank. turns out, a lot. 13 gallons, $70. others
" joins us live from tripoli. good morning, christiane. >> reporter: good morning, robin. and the failure of a so-called elite brigade of gadhafi forces to dislodge the opponents in that town, begs the question of what these forces are capable of. and whether gadhafi will send his forces against other parts of the country. we sat down with him. and he simply refuses to accept that there is an uprising against him. for days, the world has been watching an uprising by the libyan people. but the famously flamboyant libyan leader, colonel moammar gadhafi, insists that it's simply not happening. >> they love me. all my people, with me. they love me, all. >> reporter: but if they do love you -- >> they would die to protect me. my people. >> reporter: if you say they do love you, then why are they capturing benghazi? why do they say they're against you? >> it's al qaeda. it's al qaeda. it's al qaeda. it's not my people. >> reporter: but those answers provoked a strong reaction in benghazi, the country's second-largest city, where gadhafi has already lost control. >> he's crazy. >> he's lying and
, was undaunted. >> they rule against us, the fight has just begun. just begun. >> reporter: well, this court has generally been a pro-business court so the women that brought this case may face a real challenge winning it, even with three women justices up there. >> what a day on the court, though. and fascinating to hear their question. thank you, terry. as you've pointed out to us, whatever happens in the courtroom, it is still one of the stubborn facts in american life, decade after decade, statistics show that women do not make equal pay for equal work. the latest numbers, women make 77 cents for every dollar earned by a man. and nationwide, less than men working in the very same job. well, sharyn alfonsi says tonight, this can be changed, and she brings us some companies that say, here's how you do it. >> reporter: carly started working for patagonia in 1997 as a sales associate. did you think you'd be working here more than ten years later? >> i thought i'd do it for a year. >> reporter: but she's been promoted over and over again. >> sales associate. assistant store manager, store manager
. >> i think the problem is the rain, the snow melt, the dam up river. it never used to get this bad. >> reporter: northern new jersey rivers are overflowing their banks. a potent combination of three inches of rain and massive snow melt. all the rainfall in little falls is proving too much. >> really nothing i can do, but i'm stressed. i'm stressed. >> reporter: melting snow brought mud slides to massachusetts and in connecticut, the majority of state's rivers have surpassed flood stage. >> we have about a foot and a half of water inside the house. the entire living space is completely trashed. we can't -- we have nowhere to live right now. >> reporter: this man traversed the icy waters with a canoe. with cars underwater, firefighters had to use boats to rescue residents. >> it was pretty bad. my electrical wire underneath was in water, so i shut down my power and i left and went to my mom's. >> reporter: the worst may be still to come. another storm is brewing in the south. it's expected to dump another one to two inches starting tomorrow. paul wayne has work to to do. not a river,
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16